Hail field revisited!

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Morgan field gets too much rain again!

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Neighbor’s field. Weed nightmare!

Visiting the Morgan field in September didn’t revive any hope of harvesting a respectable crop after the spring hail damage. Once again, the bowls had a fair amount of water in them. Weed control was acceptable. Applying extra weed control herbicides and having migrants hand weed was definitely the right choice. The second photo here is the neighbor who chose to do nothing and eventually ran a stalk chopper through the field to take out the few corn plants he had left. He seems to have forgotten that weed control is ultimately most important.

A great view!

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East view from the 120′ grain leg.

It’s always worth the 120′ climb to the top of our grain leg. We needed to inspect and lubricate the grain system to be ready for corn harvest. Test firing the grain dryer is very critical. Without it working properly, the rest of the system sits idle and corn harvest can’t proceed. While at the top, I can’t resist taking some photos with my iPhone.

Looking to the west.

Looking to the west.

Test Plot Walk Through

Test Plot Analysis

Dennis logging variety information.

Dennis and I like to walk through our test plot pre-harvest to get a feeling for how varieties are performing ahead of combining them. The rains this year presented a challenge in getting this done in a timely manner. We exited the field with a large amount of mud on our boots.Green husk

While surveying the plot we do a stand count to see what percent of our planted stand put on a harvestable ear. We also look for health problems that are presenting themselves. This will give us an idea of what’s going on in the fields that are planted to a particular variety that’s also in the test plot. If a plant has stalk weakness or ears are already hanging down, then we know that we’ll need to keep a close eye on the field we’ve planted that variety in. If that variety isn’t in the field, we probably won’t consider it for planting another year. This is a great reason to have your own test plot rather than just looking at numbers on paper!broken corn ear

Hailed corn one month later

Hailed Corn July 13It’s been a month since one of our corn fields was decimated by hail. We chose to let it grow out and harvest what’s left. What is there is coming back nicely but, as you can see in these pictures, the east-west headlands have very few plants left. Our weed control will be running out soon as well. As time goes forward, we will need another round of weed control. This can be either a herbicide broadcast or hand weeding.Hailed Corn Headland July 13

 

 

 

July 18 Update – Another round of heavy rain has filled up the low areas once again. Morgain water July 18

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June 17 Morgan Hail Event

radar-screen-shot-stormJune 17, 2016 will stand out in my mind for many years to come. I have never witnessed such devastation of crops over such a large area. We were told that the hail track was 5 miles wide and 35 miles long. The center of the storm received wind-driven pea sized hail for 35 straight minutes. One of our corn fields is located about 1 mile west of the center of the hail track. We had just spent the first 2/3 of the day building ridges in this field readying it for next year’s bean planting.

My stomach churned then next morning as I drove to survey the damage. The last three miles made me tense up even more. I was seeing badly damaged corn and it was still getting worse as I continued east.

june-2016-hail-morgan-stand-day-6-headsThoughts were going through my mind like “How bad could it be?”; “Surely it would get better after a couple more miles. Hail isn’t usually that wide”. ¬†As I crossed the last intersection, 1/2 mile from the field, I gave up hope. I surveyed the extensive damage and huge ponds of water that first made it look like a complete loss. East-west rows were almost completely wiped out while north-south rows shielded each other from the almost straight north wind-driven hail giving them a higher survival rate. Continue reading

Thin Corn Stands

In early June we spend time scouting fields for issues we may need to deal with such as weed control, plant health and field conditions.

In this field we have identified areas of concern where the corn plant stand was thin due to wet soil conditions during and after planting. Not all seeds emerged thus lowering the potential yield from these areas of the field. We took some photos as one tool to later remedy the problem. Combining this knowledge with past observations and the upcoming harvest data will allow us to formulate a tiling plan that will help avert this situation in the future.

Taking time to identify areas of thin stands due to poor drainage is important when deciding where to best invest money in field drainage tile.

thin corn stands due to need for field tile Continue reading