Test Plot Evaluation

test plotFall is the time to evaluate our corn varieties in order to aid in decision making for next year’s planting. leaning cornOur test plot consists of 24 – 4 row strips planted 600′ long. Walking through the plot prior to harvest helps us learn about the strengths and weaknesses of each variety. This year we looked at how many harvest-able ears we have per acre along with how many of the ears were significantly under sized in our opinions. We also looked at the stalks and how much goose-necking they were doing. This year presented us with some strong winds along with a round of hail. The hail damage to the corn was minimal but the wind definitely put the stalks to the test. Now we wait for the combine and weigh wagon to give us the final results. 2015 Plot

Grain Leg Maintenance

grain cups 2Late summer means putting time into maintenance of harvest related equipment. The plastic cups on our grain leg, that handles the wet corn coming in from the fields, were getting brittle. We’ve found a couple of them stuck in various places in our grain system and succumbed to the fact that we needed to replace all 203 cups on the belt. Many of the bolts were rusted to the point where we had to either snap them off through the force of our 1/2″ DeWalt impact wrench or grind them off. After many hours the task was accomplished and we’re on to the next project!grain cups

Corn Ridging Time

ridging corn side view

Ridging corn.

I’m always amazed at how short the window is for building ridges in our corn. We had an area between two groves that grows fast because of the heat trapped there. We decided we better get that ridged before it was too tall. As long as we were at it we tried the shorter corn in the field and were pleased with how well the soil flowed through the cultivator. This is the most mellow soil we’ve cultivated in many years. We pushed hard and got through 75% of our corn acres and then got rained out on a Friday evening. It was Wednesday the next week before we got back in the corn. The corn had grown from 12-18″ to nearly 3′ tall in this amount of time. The soil was still on the wet side but the corn was visibly taller each day, so time was not on our side. We did get finished with the ridges as the rain held off. One more rain and some fields or areas of fields would have been too tall.

Post Emerge Corn Spraying

Pre-emerge weed control in corn

An area with no pre-emerge herbicide.

Early in spring, pre-emerge herbicide was applied to our corn fields. This picture shows how necessary that is. These 12 rows are in a location that we cannot get to with our field sprayer and no herbicide was applied early. You can see the weed pressure that exists in this part of the field. Those weeds will quickly rob the corn of it’s full yield potential.

Post emerge spraying will clean up weeds that come through the early application. Later we will cultivate these fields and build ridges in the corn that will serve as the seedbed for next year’s soybeans.

Post Emerge Corn Spraying 2015

Post-emerge corn spraying.