Spring 2019 – Fire, Rain and Mud!

Already in late winter we were preparing for a late and wet spring. Little did we know how late and wet it would be! While we dealt with weather delays we did what we could do to take care of preparing fields. That included burning off corn stalks in areas that drifted into think mats around water holes. It is nearly impossible to plant through these and if planting succeeds, the crop will struggle.

And then, when we were able to get moving in the field, we buried the tillage tool more than once. Most of the time we could get it our ourselves but we did need to call on a couple neighbors, with larger tractors, to help us out a couple of times.

We needed the neighbors quad track to pull this out. A few hours later, we could work through it.

Planting 2018 is Under Way – FINALLY

Planting was finally under way on May 5. It’s been a long wait this spring but there are areas of Minnesota and Iowa that continue to get rains with no end in sight. We have a window of opportunity that needs to be taken advantage of by covering a lot of acres in as short of a time as possible. That’s the same race that happens every spring in one form or another. It’s a race against weather, field conditions, yields etc. Every day, this late in the season, impacts our corn and soybean final yields.

 

Seed beans 2016

steers-morning

Early morning greeting by the steers.

putting-seed-beans-in-bin

Filling our largest bean bin.

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Cattle hanging out near the action.

beans-truck-dump

Truck dumping into belt conveyor.

a-view-form-the-top-of-the-bean-bin

Viewing the unloading process from the bin roof.

Arriving early in the morning, to load soybeans harvested the day before into storage bins, we were greeted by our curious steers. This year we raised one variety for Pioneer that will be sold as seed to farmers in 2017. Seed beans are handled more carefully that other soybeans intended for the processing market. The combine is set to thresh the soybeans as gently as possible. We use a belt conveyor to fill the storage bins as well as fill the trucks that pick up the beans during the following winter. Growing beans for seed will provide a premium that compensates for the extra time incurred plus a good profit for the grower.

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