Poor Corn Emergence

It is frustrating to find that major seed companies don’t have a level of quality control that matches their seed prices. With the impending wet and cold planting season that was forecast this spring, we had our equipment ready to get a jump start planting corn if that window of opportunity presented itself. April 18 – April 24 was our window and it quickly closed again until May 5. Two of the five varieties we planted failed at their first task of creating a good stand (high percentage) that emerges evenly. Gold Country 104-37 had very uneven emergence and a thin stand. Dekalb 52-85 had even emergence but, once again, a thin stand. Why don’t these companies publish a cold germ test on their seed tags? Warm germ is quite deceiving.

In this photos, taken from the top of our grain leg, you can see the difference in stand. The one on the left is obviously thinner than the one on the right. Both are Dekalb varieties.

Hail field revisited!

morgan-field-hail-and-water

Morgan field gets too much rain again!

morgan-neighbor

Neighbor’s field. Weed nightmare!

Visiting the Morgan field in September didn’t revive any hope of harvesting a respectable crop after the spring hail damage. Once again, the bowls had a fair amount of water in them. Weed control was acceptable. Applying extra weed control herbicides and having migrants hand weed was definitely the right choice. The second photo here is the neighbor who chose to do nothing and eventually ran a stalk chopper through the field to take out the few corn plants he had left. He seems to have forgotten that weed control is ultimately most important.

Test Plot Walk Through

Test Plot Analysis

Dennis logging variety information.

Dennis and I like to walk through our test plot pre-harvest to get a feeling for how varieties are performing ahead of combining them. The rains this year presented a challenge in getting this done in a timely manner. We exited the field with a large amount of mud on our boots.Green husk

While surveying the plot we do a stand count to see what percent of our planted stand put on a harvestable ear. We also look for health problems that are presenting themselves. This will give us an idea of what’s going on in the fields that are planted to a particular variety that’s also in the test plot. If a plant has stalk weakness or ears are already hanging down, then we know that we’ll need to keep a close eye on the field we’ve planted that variety in. If that variety isn’t in the field, we probably won’t consider it for planting another year. This is a great reason to have your own test plot rather than just looking at numbers on paper!broken corn ear

Hailed corn one month later

Hailed Corn July 13It’s been a month since one of our corn fields was decimated by hail. We chose to let it grow out and harvest what’s left. What is there is coming back nicely but, as you can see in these pictures, the east-west headlands have very few plants left. Our weed control will be running out soon as well. As time goes forward, we will need another round of weed control. This can be either a herbicide broadcast or hand weeding.Hailed Corn Headland July 13

 

 

 

July 18 Update – Another round of heavy rain has filled up the low areas once again. Morgain water July 18

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