Spraying Liberty Soybeans

Spraying soybeans 2017.

Following last summer’s devastating hail event on our Morgan field we were advised to plant Liberty Link soybeans this year to give us later season options for weed control. Driving by the field one week prior to planting made our stomachs turn. The weeds had grown very quickly this spring and were threatening to make planting difficult. We sprayed a burn down herbicide on the field and, after working it with our vertical till machine a week later, the planting went quite smooth.

Spraying Liberty Link Soybeans

A pre-emerge herbicide was applied after planting and again about a month later. Two weeks after that, we had a lot of grass laughing at us as it continued to emerge and flourish. An application of Liberty was applied and now we are preparing to cultivate the field on Monday, July 17. A lot of extra effort and money has been spent on this field due to last June’s hail. We expect our efforts to pay off by keeping the weeds from seeding. This should make the future years of weed control a little more normal.

Cattle yard rejuvenation

Old dirt removed from around the concrete.

Steers explore the manure pile.

A long overdue task was completed at the end of June. The cattle yard base has eroded over the years and becomes a mucky mess of foot deep manure that the steers must muck through to get to the cattle shed as well as stepping off the south side of the concrete pad next to the barn.

Last summer we started the task of locating some high quality clay to rejuvenate the yard but fell short of finding any. This spring we watched as a neighboring farm site was torn down and clay piles appeared on the horizon. We approached the party responsible for the clay and were granted access to it. Our window of opportunity came at the end of June as rains subsided and the yard dried up enough to work with the dirt.

A job well done!

The first thing that had to be done was remove the poor quality dirt. A mountain of dirt/manure was created. This will be hauled to the field in fall once the crops are harvested. We then borrowed a dump truck from a neighbor to haul in the clay. The clay was packed layer by layer throughout the cattle yard to give the steers a firm foundation.

All in all, a lot of time was spend on this project but it the results are well worth it. Happy steers make great steaks! Continue reading

Planting season is knocking!

Warm enough February day for the door to be open.

It happens every spring. We open the machine shed door, after clearing any remaining snow and ice from in front of it, move any equipment blocking the planter and extract the sleeping planter from it’s nest. Once the planter is outside, it receives its spring wash down. The dust that has settled on it over the past 8 months is flushed away with the power washer and the planter is ushered into the heated shop for it’s pre-planting work over. Because it worked on the day we completed planting is no reason to assume it will make it through another planting season without some refurbishing and lubrication.

Washing the dust off.

Planting weather is fickle in Minnesota. It can lull you into believing that you have all the time in the world to get the crop in and then the updated forecast puts us under the gun to get as much in before the rains or cold snap hits. We don’t want a half ready planter to come between us and the impending deadline. Continue reading

A harvest visit from Colorado

I have two sisters living in the Denver, CO area who grew on the farm. They are striving to keep their kids connected to the farm through visits usually timed around harvest. This year the weather wasn’t very cooperative so the opportunity for a combine ride was nearly non-existent. The did have a chance though to tend to the steers needs by feeding them an endless supply of apples harvested from the nearby trees.

Where there’s oil leaks, there’s fire!

Sunday, October 2 was a day to remember but not in a positive way. We had just started filling our second truck with soybeans when disaster struck. I had unloaded the combine onto the grain cart while heading back to the road. Once I got to the road, I decided to dump off the few bushels I had left in the combine since the auger was passing right over the truck as I turned around. Once unloaded, I headed back into the soybean field. I didn’t get more than 50 feet down the field when the monitor on my armrest had a big red warning about low hydraulic pressure. Thinking I was spewing oil all over the place I shut down the combine and stepped out the door to investigate. As I looked back at the engine compartment from the top platform of the ladder, I saw a large ball of flames in the hydraulic pump area. I turned on the radio and told Dennis, who was in the grain cart, to call 911 immediately. He came over, as I was emptying the cab of important items such as my monitor with all the data on it, and emptied the fire extinguisher on the fire to no avail. We did what we could to secure items from the cab and stood back watching the flames grow as we waited for the fire trucks to arrive. Needless to say, the combine was a total loss but the fire department did manage to save the bean head.

We were able to rent a combine the next day and use that until we made a purchase. We used some down time during rainy days to research and look at combines in the area and settled on a John Deere S660 from Worthington, MN.

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