Winter and Hail

One final blow by mother nature a week and a half ago was hopefully the last big snow of the winter. We did have our snow blower off of the tractor and were forced to re-attach it. These snow photos were taken earlier in the winter but it’s fun to see the steers not really care what’s going on with the weather.

We did find out though that they don’t much care for hail. The stood outside during round 1 but when round 2 showed up, they headed for the shelter as fast as a steer can run! Continue reading

Hail field revisited!

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Morgan field gets too much rain again!

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Neighbor’s field. Weed nightmare!

Visiting the Morgan field in September didn’t revive any hope of harvesting a respectable crop after the spring hail damage. Once again, the bowls had a fair amount of water in them. Weed control was acceptable. Applying extra weed control herbicides and having migrants hand weed was definitely the right choice. The second photo here is the neighbor who chose to do nothing and eventually ran a stalk chopper through the field to take out the few corn plants he had left. He seems to have forgotten that weed control is ultimately most important.

Hailed corn one month later

Hailed Corn July 13It’s been a month since one of our corn fields was decimated by hail. We chose to let it grow out and harvest what’s left. What is there is coming back nicely but, as you can see in these pictures, the east-west headlands have very few plants left. Our weed control will be running out soon as well. As time goes forward, we will need another round of weed control. This can be either a herbicide broadcast or hand weeding.Hailed Corn Headland July 13

 

 

 

July 18 Update – Another round of heavy rain has filled up the low areas once again. Morgain water July 18

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June 17 Morgan Hail Event

radar-screen-shot-stormJune 17, 2016 will stand out in my mind for many years to come. I have never witnessed such devastation of crops over such a large area. We were told that the hail track was 5 miles wide and 35 miles long. The center of the storm received wind-driven pea sized hail for 35 straight minutes. One of our corn fields is located about 1 mile west of the center of the hail track. We had just spent the first 2/3 of the day building ridges in this field readying it for next year’s bean planting.

My stomach churned then next morning as I drove to survey the damage. The last three miles made me tense up even more. I was seeing badly damaged corn and it was still getting worse as I continued east.

june-2016-hail-morgan-stand-day-6-headsThoughts were going through my mind like “How bad could it be?”; “Surely it would get better after a couple more miles. Hail isn’t usually that wide”. ¬†As I crossed the last intersection, 1/2 mile from the field, I gave up hope. I surveyed the extensive damage and huge ponds of water that first made it look like a complete loss. East-west rows were almost completely wiped out while north-south rows shielded each other from the almost straight north wind-driven hail giving them a higher survival rate. Continue reading