Spraying Liberty Soybeans

Spraying soybeans 2017.

Following last summer’s devastating hail event on our Morgan field we were advised to plant Liberty Link soybeans this year to give us later season options for weed control. Driving by the field one week prior to planting made our stomachs turn. The weeds had grown very quickly this spring and were threatening to make planting difficult. We sprayed a burn down herbicide on the field and, after working it with our vertical till machine a week later, the planting went quite smooth.

Spraying Liberty Link Soybeans

A pre-emerge herbicide was applied after planting and again about a month later. Two weeks after that, we had a lot of grass laughing at us as it continued to emerge and flourish. An application of Liberty was applied and now we are preparing to cultivate the field on Monday, July 17. A lot of extra effort and money has been spent on this field due to last June’s hail. We expect our efforts to pay off by keeping the weeds from seeding. This should make the future years of weed control a little more normal.

Hail field revisited!

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Morgan field gets too much rain again!

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Neighbor’s field. Weed nightmare!

Visiting the Morgan field in September didn’t revive any hope of harvesting a respectable crop after the spring hail damage. Once again, the bowls had a fair amount of water in them. Weed control was acceptable. Applying extra weed control herbicides and having migrants hand weed was definitely the right choice. The second photo here is the neighbor who chose to do nothing and eventually ran a stalk chopper through the field to take out the few corn plants he had left. He seems to have forgotten that weed control is ultimately most important.

Soybean weed control

Weed

One of the few weeds.

Spraying Right Boom ViewWeed control in soybeans is a summer long effort. In early July, we made our 3rd pass with the sprayer. The first pass was right after planting and consisted of a herbicide to burn down existing weeds as well as one that gave us about 1 month of control for emerging weeds. The second pass was similar but using chemicals with different modes of action to circumvent weeds becoming resistant to the few chemicals we have left. For the 3rd and final pass we use Roundup and a grass control herbicide. The grass control herbicide controls the volunteer corn. The Roundup will control some weeds that aren’t resistant. We will use hand weeding as a follow up to control weeds that are Roundup resistant.

Final Pass Spraying Beans

Excellent pre-emerge herbicide control.

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Can you say “tall beans!”?

Beans-Lance

Lance in the tall soybeans.

Beans_Dennis

Dennis shows the soybean height.

We spent part of a day last week hand weeding soybeans. It was quite the experience when we found beans up to our armpits. These are much harder to walk through but we managed. Eventually we were rained out with a, much welcomed, 2.5″+ rain over a couple of days. This will go a long ways in filling the pods and ears on this year’s crop. We are still finding soybean aphids in the field that we sprayed a few weeks ago. So farm the levels do not warrant a second round of insecticide.

helicopter

Helicopter giving workers parts.

As we walked the field we also were entertained by the power company workers adding stabilizer bars to the new power lines on the north edge our our field. Workers dangled from the three levels of lines and attached equipment that was fed to them by helicopter. Suddenly we saw the helicopter pluck each worker off the line and fly away with them dangling on the long line. We didn’t know what brought on this sudden whisking away of the workers until the rain started to fall on us. They were keeping a better eye on the weather that I was, I guess.